My Current Reflection on Collabrative Teaching
missconnelly
As you all know several educators and my self began working together on a collaborative teaching community (2ndedliteracy) to share our ideas about teaching literacy across several content areas. During this time we began our first collaborative unit on Literacy, Democracy and Social Change. We all worked together to research as many resources we could find that might assist us in teaching this unit in our content area. I posted many websites exploring political campaign advertisements, political cartoons and art pieces that art teachers may use to analyze and discuss the strategies these types of mediums use to persuade, inform, or provoke the viewer in some way. Later I suggest a unit of art activities that students could engage in while they move through this same unit in their other subject areas such as Math, History and Social Studies. Our big idea was that we could help our students gain multi-literacy skills and grasp difficult concepts like Democracy by having them engage in these concepts in a variety of contexts, giving them multiple ways of accessing knowledge and demonstrating what the know. Teaching in this way, supports multiple intelligences and learning styles while also providing a much needed  solution to the limited amount of time we have to teach our crowded classrooms do to budget cuts every year.  Through time we believe that if more teachers came together in this way to plan more collaborative lesson plans and units, a community like this would be a terrific resource. (Especially for new teachers) And we can then, all become teachers of literacy!

Starting this community, we decided to do our first Literacy unit on Democracy and Social Change because we felt that teaching social responsibility and literacy are two very relevant skills necessary for the future development of our society. We felt it was important for students to be well informed, active members of society. In the future, our hope is that we can work together with other content teachers to create even more Units and Lessons, while also contributing new and current resources that we can all use. Democracy was just the beginning!

Despite all of the excellent resources and lessons we have shared in this community, we have run into a few problems/complications working on a social networking site such as Live Journal. As we continue we may find better ways to use Live Journal for this community or make use of other sites like Ning. One problem we've run into is learning how to properly set privacy settings so that anyone can access our posts without needing to be a Live Journal member. Secondly we felt that this may not be the most user friendly site for someone who is not a Live Journal user. Thirdly, the layout on Live Journal doesn't really allow you to categorize or organize information very well, so one could get lost scrolling through a continuous list of posts, while getting tossed back and forth from profile to profile.  Lastly, we're not sure how many teachers would actually use Live Journal.  But its great that Live Journal is a free networking site that can be easily used to create a community, unlike paid site such as Ning. And we like that we can post text, images, web links and video on this site.  Aside from technical difficulties, working as a group can always cause some frustration. Since you are working with others, you have to deal with the waiting and hoping  for responses, overcoming communication issues, and just being able to cooperate and work well with others to come up with quality lessons and units as a team. Sometimes teachers may not always meet eye to eye. But overall I think that the idea of coming together to teach students in a variety of ways can be very useful and beneficial for education at large.

Special thanks to all of my collaborative teachers who have worked so hard on this site!

Unit 1: Democracy and Social Activism Through Visual Art
missconnelly

The following art activities are meant to support a larger cooperative unit on democracy and social responsibility.  ( http://community.livejournal.com/2ndedliteracy/)In this first unit students will be learning vital research and comprehension skills in their math and social studies classes while focusing on visual literacy in art to better interpret political rhetoric other social represented in imagery that surrounds us every day.  Students who successfully complete this unit will:

  • Be able to identify and critically interpret persuasive elements such as symbolism, text, graphs, compositions, color, etc., used in a variety of visual media such as political commercial/advertising, cartoons, public art and fine art.
  • Will gain a better understanding of how persuasive imagery can influence our opinions and choices.
  • Find out who their candidates are.
  • Be able to identify current social issues that affect us locally and globally.
  • Find out where candidates stand on various social issues.
  • Make decisions based on information, not rhetoric.
  • Be able to produces advertisements and political works of art incorporating 2-3 persuasive, motivational or provoking strategies discussed in class.

Most of these art lessons/activities can be modified for grades 6-12 and should be spread out over several weeks at a time.

Lesson One-Interpreting Campaign Advertisements.

Activities

-Students will look at and critically analyze 2-3 campaign advertisement images or videos in a class discussion.

Resources

http://www.livingroomcandidate.org/

projects.washingtonpost.com/politicalads/

www.hulu.com/historic-campaign-ads

  •  Describe what you see in this image.
  •  Who is being represented here? (Race, Party, Candidates, Gender, State, etc.)
  •  Can you find any negative messages in this add?
  •  Who or what is this add is this add wanting us to support or believe?
  •  How might you be persuaded by this add and why? What strategies do they use(i.e. text, imagery, graphs, audio, emotion,  etc.)
  • What issues are represented here, if any? And what side of this issue does this add promote? How do you know?

-Using I-movie or Movie Maker students can create a pretend  campaign advertisement video(as a group)representing at least one made up candidate(address SES), at least 2 different parties, at least one issue(take a side on the issue). Issues can include race, gender, economics, environment, animal rights, etc. Video can include a combination of moving image, still image, text, and music/sound to persuade, motivate or provoke a specific audience using 2-3 of the strategies discussed in class.

Or

-Using Photo Shop or a similar photo editing program, students can create a pretend campaign advertisement image (as a group) representing at least one made up candidate (address SES), at least 2 different parties, at least one issue (take a side on the issue). Issues can include race, gender, economics, environment, animal rights, etc.  Students will use these programs to collage together photos of people places and/or things as well as text.  Students will choose and organize text and images in a way that will persuade, motivate, or provide a specific audience using 2-3 of the strategies discussed in class.

-Students could also be assigned to represent the opposite of their own personal perspectives or beliefs in their work of art to switch things up a bit.

-Students may need a demonstration on how to use I-movie/movie maker or photo shop before getting started on their project.

 

Wrap up

-Students will present their advertisement adds to their classmates and will receive feedback from their peers.

-Students will reflect on the perspectives they chose to represent in their adds, including the strategies they used and why as a 1-2 paragraph journal entry at the end of class.

Standards:

·         Students will understand and apply media, techniques, and processes demonstrated in class.

·         Students will integrate visual, spatial, and temporal concepts with content to communicate intended meaning in their artworks.

·         Students will use subjects, themes, and symbols that demonstrate knowledge of contexts, values, and aesthetics that communicate intended meaning in artworks.

·         Students will understand the visual arts in relation to history and cultures.

·         Students will reflect upon and assess the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others.

·         Students will make connections between visual arts and other disciplines. (i.e. math, history, social studies, and language arts)

 

 

Lesson two: Interpreting Political Art

Activities

- Students will look at and critically analyze 2-3 political cartoons and fine art pieces in a class discussion.

Resources

www.cartoonstock.com/newscartoons/directory/p/political_ads.asp

politicalhumor.about.com/library/bldailyfeed2.htm#topic1

http://missconnelly.livejournal.com/1371.html

  •  Describe what you see in this image.
  • Who is being represented here? (Race, Party, Candidates, Gender, State, etc.)
  • Can you find any negative or positive messages in this add?
  • Who or what is this add is this add wanting us to support, feel or believe?
  • How might you be persuaded by this add and why? What strategies do they use(i.e. text, photos, emotion,  caricatures, humor, use of color and line, etc.)
  • What issues are represented here, if any? And what side of this issue does this add promote? How do you know?

-Students will create a political cartoon or realistic painting (as a group)representing at least one made up candidate(address SES), at least 2 different parties or perspectives, at least one issue(take a side on the issue). Issues can include race, gender, economics, environment, animal rights, etc. Students will create their work of art using 3 or more of the strategies discussed in class to persuade, motivate or provoke a specific audience.  Students will consider the effects of  style, color, texture, line, composition, text, etc., when creating their own art work.

-Students could also be assigned to represent the opposite of their own personal perspectives or beliefs in their work of art to switch things up a bit.

-Any drawing or painting demos necessary should also be worked into activity plan.

 Wrap up

-Students will present their political cartoon or realistic painting to their classmates and will receive feedback from their peers.

-Students will reflect on the perspectives they chose to represent in their adds, including the strategies they used and why as a 1-2 paragraph journal entry at the end of class.

Standards:

·         Students will understand and apply media, techniques, and processes demonstrated in class.

·         Students will integrate visual, spatial, and temporal concepts with content to communicate intended meaning in their artworks.

·         Students will use subjects, themes, and symbols that demonstrate knowledge of contexts, values, and aesthetics that communicate intended meaning in artworks.

·         Students will understand the visual arts in relation to history and cultures.

·         Students will reflect upon and assess the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others.

·         Students will make connections between visual arts and other disciplines. (i.e. history, social studies, and language arts)

 

Lesson Three: Social Activism

Activities

- Students will first identify core needs/social issues (locally or globally) in their social studies class.

-Later students will team up with their Math teacher,  Art Teacher and Social Studies Teacher to create a piece of public art that will be on display in school and in the community.  Each piece of art should reflect on a social need or issue using 3 or more of the strategies discussed in lessons one and two of this unit to persuade, inform, motivate, inspire or provoke viewers in the community. Public art can include, posters, murals, framed drawings/collage/painting/cartoons/photomontage, even sculpture!

  • What are you wanting to communicate?
  • Who are you speaking to?
  • Who is involved?
  • Who can community members get involved?

-Students can also create works of art following the same guidelines as above but selling them in a local show to raise money for various social causes.

-Students may need to briefly review persuasive/informative strategies discussed in lesson one and two before planning their public art project.

-Be sure to discuss laws about how to properly display public art.

Wrap up

-Students will later(independently), write a brief reflection about issue they chose to address in the community and the process of both creating and displaying their work. What were some problems they ran into when planning or executing their project? What were some outcomes they noticed after displaying or distributing their work in the community? How did this project make them feel in the end? Do they feel this was a success?

Standards:

·         Students will understand and apply media, techniques, and processes demonstrated in class.

·         Students will integrate visual, spatial, and temporal concepts with content to communicate intended meaning in their artworks.

·         Students will use subjects, themes, and symbols that demonstrate knowledge of contexts, values, and aesthetics that communicate intended meaning in artworks.

·         Students will understand the visual arts in relation to history and cultures.

·         Students will reflect upon and assess the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others.

·         Students will make connections between visual arts and other disciplines. (i.e. Math, history, social studies, and language arts)

 


Political FineArts
missconnelly
Much of our visual culture including the fine arts depict sometimes controversial political content. In teaching our students to be more socially aware and more active as members of a community, it seems important for them to not only be aware of the messages being sent out in political advertising and videos but also within the fine arts world. This is also a great way to see how we can explore ideas and express our own beliefs and experiences through art as political activists.
These are a few interesting images and sites that students could look at and discuss in classroom activities:

http://www.allenschmertzler-artist.com/index.html

http://www.mannenberg.com/

http://rmarkey.blue-fox.com/Political.html

http://www.streetcredart.com/political%20art.htm

http://www.socialpoliticalart.com/

Within literacy there are many ways to gain knowledge about the current state of the world and it's political history.

The Art and Social Studies Lens: How to interpret political adds
missconnelly
 We mentioned earlier that it would be good to teach our students how to decode and critically interpret various kinds of political images, videos and texts. Here are a few links I've found that might be good resources. I'll be adding more websites, images, and videos at a later time.

http://www.livingroomcandidate.org/

Introduction:

"The idea that you can merchandise candidates for high office like breakfast cereal is the ultimate indignity to the democratic process."
-Democratic candidate Adlai Stevenson, 1956

"Television is no gimmick, and nobody will ever be elected to major office again without presenting themselves well on it."
-Television producer and Nixon campaign consultant Roger Ailes, 1968

In a media-saturated environment in which news, opinions, and entertainment surround us all day on our television sets, computers, and cell phones, the television commercial remains the one area where presidential candidates have complete control over their images. Television commercials use all the tools of fiction filmmaking, including script, visuals, editing, and performance, to distill a candidate's major campaign themes into a few powerful images. Ads elicit emotional reactions, inspiring support for a candidate or raising doubts about his opponent. While commercials reflect the styles and techniques of the times in which they were made, the fundamental strategies and messages have tended to remain the same over the years.

The Living Room Candidate contains more than 300 commercials, from every presidential election since 1952, when Madison Avenue advertising executive Rosser Reeves convinced Dwight Eisenhower that short ads played during such popular TV programs as I Love Lucy would reach more voters than any other form of advertising. This innovation had a permanent effect on the way presidential campaigns are run.

projects.washingtonpost.com/politicalads/
 

About The Political Ads Database

The database includes political advertisements funded by campaigns, parties, committees, and independent advocacy groups. Most of the ads are tied to specific U.S. House, U.S. Senate, or gubernatorial races throughout the country. Some of the ads are more general "issue" or advocacy ads not tied to a particular race or candidate. You can search for ads based on the criteria listed below.

www.hulu.com/historic-campaign-ads

Channels. News and Information. Description. Relive some of the most iconic campaign ads from the 1950s through 1980s.

www.cartoonstock.com/newscartoons/directory/p/political_ads.asp

Political Ads News Cartoon directory - the world's largest on-line collection of news related cartoons and comics, all searchable in directory form.

politicalhumor.about.com/library/bldailyfeed2.htm#topic1

Political Cartoon Collections Editorial Cartoon Sites Political Comic Strips, Web Cartoons


(This source may be questionable depending on the age of your students)


My first day!
missconnelly
Today is my first day on Live Journal. I wanted to start a networking community for teachers to share ideas so I needed to start an account first. So here I am......hope I make some friends!

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