Previous Entry Share Next Entry
Unit 1: Democracy and Social Activism Through Visual Art
missconnelly

The following art activities are meant to support a larger cooperative unit on democracy and social responsibility.  ( http://community.livejournal.com/2ndedliteracy/)In this first unit students will be learning vital research and comprehension skills in their math and social studies classes while focusing on visual literacy in art to better interpret political rhetoric other social represented in imagery that surrounds us every day.  Students who successfully complete this unit will:

  • Be able to identify and critically interpret persuasive elements such as symbolism, text, graphs, compositions, color, etc., used in a variety of visual media such as political commercial/advertising, cartoons, public art and fine art.
  • Will gain a better understanding of how persuasive imagery can influence our opinions and choices.
  • Find out who their candidates are.
  • Be able to identify current social issues that affect us locally and globally.
  • Find out where candidates stand on various social issues.
  • Make decisions based on information, not rhetoric.
  • Be able to produces advertisements and political works of art incorporating 2-3 persuasive, motivational or provoking strategies discussed in class.

Most of these art lessons/activities can be modified for grades 6-12 and should be spread out over several weeks at a time.

Lesson One-Interpreting Campaign Advertisements.

Activities

-Students will look at and critically analyze 2-3 campaign advertisement images or videos in a class discussion.

Resources

http://www.livingroomcandidate.org/

projects.washingtonpost.com/politicalads/

www.hulu.com/historic-campaign-ads

  •  Describe what you see in this image.
  •  Who is being represented here? (Race, Party, Candidates, Gender, State, etc.)
  •  Can you find any negative messages in this add?
  •  Who or what is this add is this add wanting us to support or believe?
  •  How might you be persuaded by this add and why? What strategies do they use(i.e. text, imagery, graphs, audio, emotion,  etc.)
  • What issues are represented here, if any? And what side of this issue does this add promote? How do you know?

-Using I-movie or Movie Maker students can create a pretend  campaign advertisement video(as a group)representing at least one made up candidate(address SES), at least 2 different parties, at least one issue(take a side on the issue). Issues can include race, gender, economics, environment, animal rights, etc. Video can include a combination of moving image, still image, text, and music/sound to persuade, motivate or provoke a specific audience using 2-3 of the strategies discussed in class.

Or

-Using Photo Shop or a similar photo editing program, students can create a pretend campaign advertisement image (as a group) representing at least one made up candidate (address SES), at least 2 different parties, at least one issue (take a side on the issue). Issues can include race, gender, economics, environment, animal rights, etc.  Students will use these programs to collage together photos of people places and/or things as well as text.  Students will choose and organize text and images in a way that will persuade, motivate, or provide a specific audience using 2-3 of the strategies discussed in class.

-Students could also be assigned to represent the opposite of their own personal perspectives or beliefs in their work of art to switch things up a bit.

-Students may need a demonstration on how to use I-movie/movie maker or photo shop before getting started on their project.

 

Wrap up

-Students will present their advertisement adds to their classmates and will receive feedback from their peers.

-Students will reflect on the perspectives they chose to represent in their adds, including the strategies they used and why as a 1-2 paragraph journal entry at the end of class.

Standards:

·         Students will understand and apply media, techniques, and processes demonstrated in class.

·         Students will integrate visual, spatial, and temporal concepts with content to communicate intended meaning in their artworks.

·         Students will use subjects, themes, and symbols that demonstrate knowledge of contexts, values, and aesthetics that communicate intended meaning in artworks.

·         Students will understand the visual arts in relation to history and cultures.

·         Students will reflect upon and assess the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others.

·         Students will make connections between visual arts and other disciplines. (i.e. math, history, social studies, and language arts)

 

 

Lesson two: Interpreting Political Art

Activities

- Students will look at and critically analyze 2-3 political cartoons and fine art pieces in a class discussion.

Resources

www.cartoonstock.com/newscartoons/directory/p/political_ads.asp

politicalhumor.about.com/library/bldailyfeed2.htm#topic1

http://missconnelly.livejournal.com/1371.html

  •  Describe what you see in this image.
  • Who is being represented here? (Race, Party, Candidates, Gender, State, etc.)
  • Can you find any negative or positive messages in this add?
  • Who or what is this add is this add wanting us to support, feel or believe?
  • How might you be persuaded by this add and why? What strategies do they use(i.e. text, photos, emotion,  caricatures, humor, use of color and line, etc.)
  • What issues are represented here, if any? And what side of this issue does this add promote? How do you know?

-Students will create a political cartoon or realistic painting (as a group)representing at least one made up candidate(address SES), at least 2 different parties or perspectives, at least one issue(take a side on the issue). Issues can include race, gender, economics, environment, animal rights, etc. Students will create their work of art using 3 or more of the strategies discussed in class to persuade, motivate or provoke a specific audience.  Students will consider the effects of  style, color, texture, line, composition, text, etc., when creating their own art work.

-Students could also be assigned to represent the opposite of their own personal perspectives or beliefs in their work of art to switch things up a bit.

-Any drawing or painting demos necessary should also be worked into activity plan.

 Wrap up

-Students will present their political cartoon or realistic painting to their classmates and will receive feedback from their peers.

-Students will reflect on the perspectives they chose to represent in their adds, including the strategies they used and why as a 1-2 paragraph journal entry at the end of class.

Standards:

·         Students will understand and apply media, techniques, and processes demonstrated in class.

·         Students will integrate visual, spatial, and temporal concepts with content to communicate intended meaning in their artworks.

·         Students will use subjects, themes, and symbols that demonstrate knowledge of contexts, values, and aesthetics that communicate intended meaning in artworks.

·         Students will understand the visual arts in relation to history and cultures.

·         Students will reflect upon and assess the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others.

·         Students will make connections between visual arts and other disciplines. (i.e. history, social studies, and language arts)

 

Lesson Three: Social Activism

Activities

- Students will first identify core needs/social issues (locally or globally) in their social studies class.

-Later students will team up with their Math teacher,  Art Teacher and Social Studies Teacher to create a piece of public art that will be on display in school and in the community.  Each piece of art should reflect on a social need or issue using 3 or more of the strategies discussed in lessons one and two of this unit to persuade, inform, motivate, inspire or provoke viewers in the community. Public art can include, posters, murals, framed drawings/collage/painting/cartoons/photomontage, even sculpture!

  • What are you wanting to communicate?
  • Who are you speaking to?
  • Who is involved?
  • Who can community members get involved?

-Students can also create works of art following the same guidelines as above but selling them in a local show to raise money for various social causes.

-Students may need to briefly review persuasive/informative strategies discussed in lesson one and two before planning their public art project.

-Be sure to discuss laws about how to properly display public art.

Wrap up

-Students will later(independently), write a brief reflection about issue they chose to address in the community and the process of both creating and displaying their work. What were some problems they ran into when planning or executing their project? What were some outcomes they noticed after displaying or distributing their work in the community? How did this project make them feel in the end? Do they feel this was a success?

Standards:

·         Students will understand and apply media, techniques, and processes demonstrated in class.

·         Students will integrate visual, spatial, and temporal concepts with content to communicate intended meaning in their artworks.

·         Students will use subjects, themes, and symbols that demonstrate knowledge of contexts, values, and aesthetics that communicate intended meaning in artworks.

·         Students will understand the visual arts in relation to history and cultures.

·         Students will reflect upon and assess the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others.

·         Students will make connections between visual arts and other disciplines. (i.e. Math, history, social studies, and language arts)

 


?

Log in